Worms Worms What to DO?

We get a lot of requests for WORMS, but not every worm is the same! Before you order worms with us, please take a moment to learn a little about the WHATS WHYS and HOWS of worms. And listen, I know how it goes, your Grandfather, your Aunt, or a good family friend, knows a lot about worms, and since we all learn our gardening skills and secrets from those that came before us, we want to apply those tricks to our garden. But before you waste your time and money throwing red wigglers in your garden, take a moment and figure out the best plan for your season.

WORMS WORMS What kind??

RED WIGGLER Eisenia Fetida

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Red Wigglers are a composting worm. They prefer a place where there is a high rate of decomposition. We sell these worms for people interested in starting their own composting or vermiculture bin.

“I just want to throw them in my garden to loosen up the soil. I’ve heard worms are good for the garden.”

YIKES! No! Red Wigglers are an epigeal worm. That means they live their life within the surface of the soil, usually under material that is usually nutrient rich and decomposing. This could be manure pile, or wet soggy logs, and of course compost heaps. They are usually no longer than a crayon when they aren’t stretched out, and they can be as thin as pencil graphite. Red Wigglers like to huddle together and eat rotting food and other organic material, but they do not spread out in the soil and till the way you may think. Red Wigglers are also a favorite dish of robins and blue jays, so that bag of worms you just tossed in your garden will probably get eaten in a couple weeks.

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European Nightcrawler Eisenia Hortensis

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European Nightcrawlers are not to be confused with the common earthworm, sometimes called the “Canadian Nightcrawler”(lumbricus terrestris). European Nightcrawlers are another red worm that lives in rotting material, and will help your composting efforts. They typically grow to be about twice the size of Red Wigglers, but not as large as the Canadian Nightcrawler that is in the lumbricus genus. An easy way to distinguish them from a red wiggler is by looking at the saddle(scientific term-clitellum), the reproductive band on their body. If you see this red worm, and it is already 2-3 inches long but does not have a developed saddle, this will tell you it is a younger nightcrawler, as opposed to the red wiggler which would have already developed a lump for its saddle band at this size. These worms can adapt a little better than Red Wigglers, digging a little deeper in the soil, but they are still considered top dwellers. Robins love them, and while they may break down some organic material, they are much better suited for your compost heap or bin.

“Okay I get it, but worms are supposed to till the garden! I know they are good for the soil and my grandfather used to always put them in his garden”

 

Canadian Nightcrawler Lumbricus Terrestris

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Although all the worms we’re discussing are technically earthworms, when most people say “earthworm” they are thinking of a Canadian Earthworm or something similar, most often in the lumbricus genus, and not eisenia. This worm is in the anecic classification, and digs large burrows down into the ground, coming up to feed on litter and bring it down into their burrow. These worms are often used for bait, and are likely what people like to throw in their garden in attempts to keep the soil turned and tilled. But wait, don’t…

“YES, I want to put these in the garden…”

STOP! All of these earthworms are present in the environment. Before you go throwing worms in your soil, take note of a few important things.

  1. If you don’t have worms in your soil, there is a good chance you do not have enough organic material in your garden beds. Even the hardiest earthworm isn’t going to till clay, or bring nutrients into poor compacted soil. You need to add organic material to your garden. Do this by adding fresh compost, and mulching with things like chipped leaves from your spring clean up, or straw. The combination of all these things will draw up worms and other beneficial critters into your soil to help create a living biome in your soil which is what you want.
  2. Earthworms like the Canadian Nightcawler ARE considered invasive in certain ecological environments. While you might think they are going to help in your garden, they are damaging to forest ecosystems, and even heavy perennial environments. These worms will eat through organic material so quickly that 1. The nutrients from their castings(poop) will wash away quickly, leaving the site where they are needed, and in many cases this leads to eutrophication  2. The organic material that is typically used by trees and large perennials as a slow release fertilizer is eaten too quickly by these worms. Again, this pertains to forest ecosystems primarily, but we go back to the first point- there is no need to add them when you can introduce them naturally and avoid adding more to the environment that probably already exists.
  3. Farmers in this country often see worms as a good sign in their soil, but that’s because they are growing on acres and acres of land, and need all the help they can get sometimes. This is probably where that farmer’s wisdom gets handed down to you, the backyard gardener. If you are gardening in your yard, you should be able to manage your soil with compost applications on other no-till techniques and have a lot of success even without worms.

 

If you are still interested in purchasing worms from us, we will be selling worm start kits for your home composting- a mix of Red Wigglers and European Nightcrawlers, starting in April. We don’t have a retail location this season, so we can deliver them to you on Fridays and Saturdays when our drivers are on routes. We should have that page up and ready here in the next couple days.

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Join In!

We are still growing! If you are in our service area, click the Compost Exchange button and learn about how you can start composting hassle free. For current customers, we’ve listed pick up days by neighborhood below.

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We are excited to update our website in the coming months, as well as start planning for Spring 2019. We’ll introduce you to our new team, and hopefully share some more cool developments.

FRIDAYS

Wilkinsburg, Regent Square, Edgewood, Swissvale, Greenfield, Oakland, Squirrel Hill, Shadyside

SATURDAYS

North Side, Hill District, Strip District, Lawrenceville, Stanton Heights, Morningside, Highland Park, Larimer, Friendship, Point Breeze

**THANKSGIVING 2018

All FRIDAY routes will be moved to MONDAY (11/26)

All SATURDAY routes will be moved to TUESDAY (11/27)

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Pumpkin Smash Charity Event!

Go carve Jack-o-Lanterns with your friends for Halloween! On November 3rd you can bring them, along with a charitable item, to Shadyside Nursery and watch us smash them for you* and compost the guts! The compost we make will be donated to the Women’s Center and Shelter for their gardening programs, but more importantly, you charitable gift will support families in need of your generosity.

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*This event is designed to gather charitable items and donations for the Women’s Center and Shelter of Greater Pittsburgh. As much as we want pumpkins to be composted, we ask that you bring a gift for the WC&S if you want to see it smooshed. Thank you!

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Winter Worm News

Expanded Service Area 2018

We would like to announce some big news for our Compost Exchange Program! We have expanded our service area for the program to a few North Side neighborhoods; West Allegheny, East Allegheny, Central Allegheny, Troy Hill, Spring Hill, Spring Garden.

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Increased Returns For Customers!

We have doubled the returns for our customers in the exchange program so now each customer will be getting back 30lbs of worm castings every quarter! We also have other product options for your returns other than the worm castings (which are an incredible organic fertilizer). You can mix and match a combination of indoor potting soil, seed starting mix, or leaf compost to fit your needs.

All of our customers get a quarterly newsletter that goes into more detail about these options, as well as other information about what we do. If you aren’t yet a customer but would like to receive the newsletter we would be happy to add you to the list, just send an email to shadysideworms@gmail.com

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This 3.5 gallon bucket holds 10lbs of worm castings, get 3 times this amount every quarter!

Attention All Non-Profits That Love to Garden!

Are you planning on using compost this spring? You can get free compost from our customers that are a part of our Compost Exchange Program. Let us know before you start your seed swaps, gardening workshops, and other springtime activities so we can arrange for compost drop offs. The best way to get in touch is to send an email to shadysideworms@gmail.com

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Seasons

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Thank you for checking out my business! 2017 season has begun, and I thought I’d take a moment to talk about how this all started.

In 2012, before Shadyside Worms, I found myself able to practice my gardening and composting hobbies again, after years of renting in different apartments that had little to no balcony space to work with, I was finally moving into a house with a backyard. It provided me with the opportunity to dig in to the earth again, echoing my grandfather’s aged hands that showed me what a trusty pocket knife and rugged fingernails can accomplish.

When I moved into that house, my roommate and I plowed the sod and weeds to build a garden. I put a simple compost pit together for a household of three. Four walls of plywood- about 2′ x 3′ each, and a couple pieces of scrap wood to lay on top of the mix inside. The compost pit was set back under a mulberry tree canopy that rarely let light into one corner of the yard. A handful of composting worms added to the mix set everything into motion, and I finally got the most beautifully rich worm castings I had ever produced. The following spring, Shadyside Nursery gave me the space and opportunity to start my own vermiculture business.

Vermiculture techniques can vary a lot depending on the set up. I first learned about “composting worms” from my friend Adam Fisher when I was living in Baltimore. In the back alley of his duplex home in the city, and he opened up a $5.00 rubbermaid trash can lid to show me some food scraps that he was feeding to composting worms. We were well into July, and the food had began to putrefy, but he grabbed a half of a watermelon he had recently added to show me a few stragglers, “I think most of them are escaping out of the bottom”, he said, “I had to drill a few holes in the can to let the liquid out”. He turned to show me a trail of leachate dribbling down his driveway leaving an odd trail of acidic sediment.

My first experience learning about vermiculture was in truth, not incredibly unique. These moments happen all the time with gardeners, horticulturalists, permaculture students, entomologists, sustainability designers, etc. We all collectively show-and-tell, share tactics and solutions, or at least sympathize about the frustration often involved. One of the driving factors in this constant exchange of information is the fact that we share our past mistakes to help others learn, and at the same time strive to take on a new projects. The root of wisdom and understanding in any of these fields comes from the direct observation of nature and the curious but resilient decision making skills it shows throughout each season or life cycle.

This is Shadyside Worms’ 5th season. Until recently I was thinking it was the 4th actually, but I’m just happy to be moving forward. I have found persistence through the support and passion of urban agriculturists in Pittsburgh that help businesses like this one survive. I appreciate being able to witness this culture first hand, to listen to, and hopefully share at least the wisdom of other people’s stories and experiences.

And one last word about “gardening”. I have nothing against the word, but let’s face it, even in Pittsburgh, one of the greenest cities I’ve witnessed, we are urban agriculturists. I would hope that the work you put into gardening soon turns into a sustainable lifestyle, and a mind for the importance of our natural environment. If I’ve had one mission with this business over the years, it’s to prove that we all have green thumbs, and we all have the ability to create product from the work we put into our efforts. Composting is only one aspect of the many projects ahead of us as we create a healthy, thriving, living city.

Enjoy it!

Travis Leivo

Owner & Chief Worm Officer (CWO)

 

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Community Composting

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Join us for a workshop that will teach you how to compost large amounts of waste in a community setting. Start a composting group in your neighborhood, build a compost heap at your community garden, or empower your organization to compost after events. This hands-on workshop will give you the tips and tricks to compost on a larger scale.

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Garlic Needs Great Compost

Garlic is often overlooked by gardeners in Pennsylvania, but it is incredibly easy to grow and there are dozens of varieties to try.

Garlic is most often planted in the fall in the Zone 5/6 temperate zones, but it is easy to plant, and often times it is worth planting in the spring if you forgot to plant last year.

Now that March is just around the corner, it is important to find yourself some quality garlic- preferably “seed” garlic if you can find it. Local farmers like Enon Valley Garlic Company are typically sold out of their seed garlic varieties this time of year, but grocery stores like East End food cooperative and Giant Eagle Market District often sell quality garlic that will make do as seed garlic. Sometimes you can find special varieties like elephant garlic, but you can also look for any kind of organic garlic, and check to see if some of what they are selling is starting to sprout:

sprouting fresh garlic

sprouting fresh garlic

The earliest time to plant garlic in the spring is in March, when you can start to work the soil. It helps to have 3+ days above 40 degrees. Make sure you have some quality compost to put in your garden bed before planting, or get some worm castings to mix in to your soil. When we get a good 2-3 days of guaranteed warm weather, and you can work the soil to add your compost, go ahead and get ready to plant. Planting in March will give you whole cloves of your own homegrown garlic by July/August.

Planting your garlic is easy, but I will leave it to Enon Valley garlic Company to give you concise directions. Get out there and play in the dirt!

http://www.enonvalleygarlic.com/growing-garlic.html

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